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Hello English

.........you live long (may/might)

March 11, 2017
#$%@4-
10
may
119 Upvotes 15 Downvotes March 11, 2017
18
May you live long. means I wish you live long. Might you live long. means I allow you, or maybe you live long. :)
101 Upvotes 9 Downvotes March 22, 2017
8
may
49 Upvotes 8 Downvotes March 16, 2017
2
May and might are both ways of expressing possibility. Is there a difference between the way in which they should be used? Some people insist that you should use may (present tense) when talking about a current situation and might (past tense) when talking about an event that happened in the past. For example: I may go home early if I’m tired. (present tense) He might have visited Italy before settling in Nuremberg. (past tense) In practice, this distinction is rarely made today and the two words are generally interchangeable: I might go home early if I’m tired. He may have visited Italy before settling in Nuremberg. But there is a distinction between may have and might have in certain contexts. If the truth of a situation is still not known at the time of speaking or writing, either of the two is acceptable: By the time you read this, he may have made his decision
43 Upvotes 10 Downvotes March 22, 2017
4
may
30 Upvotes 6 Downvotes March 22, 2017
4
May
25 Upvotes 6 Downvotes March 17, 2017
2
May
23 Upvotes 5 Downvotes March 20, 2017
1
may you live long
20 Upvotes 4 Downvotes March 20, 2017
1
may you live long
19 Upvotes 4 Downvotes March 22, 2017
3
may
15 Upvotes 3 Downvotes March 22, 2017
1
.........you live long (may/might)
may

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