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How many tenses are there in English?

January 13, 2017
akshay goyal
10
In English, there are 3 tenses: PAST, PRESENT and FUTURE. These tenses are further conjugated on the basis of: Simple, Continuous, Perfect and Perfect Continuous. Let us look at the tenses and their structure. Note, in the structure: Subject = S Object = O Verb = V (V1 = present; V2 = past, V3 = future)1. PAST TENSEa. Simple Past: I ate spinach yesterday. Usage: To indicate past habit – or an action that has already been completed. Structure: S + V2 + O b. Past Continuous: I was eating spinach. Usage: To indicate uncompleted action of the past. Structure: S + ‘was/were’ + (V + ing) + O c. Past Perfect: I had eaten spinach when she arrived. Usage: The past perfect refers to a time earlier than before now. It is used to make it clear that one event happened before another in the past. It does not matter which event is mentioned first - the tense makes it clear which one happened first. Structure: S + ‘had’ + V3 + Od. Perfect Continuous: I had been eating spinach when she arrived. Usage: We use the Past Perfect Continuous to show that something started in the past and continued up until another time in the past. Structure: S + ‘had been’ + (V + ing) + O2. PRESENT TENSEa. Simple Present Tense: I east spinach every day. Usage: 1. To express habits, general truths, repeated actions or unchanging situations, emotions and wishes. 2. To express fixed arrangements, present or future: Your exam starts at 09.00 Structure: S + V1 + Ob. Present Continuous Tense: I am eating spinach. Usage: Action taking place in the moment of speaking Structure: S + ‘am/is/are’ + (V + ing) + Oc. Present Perfect Tense: I have eaten all of the spinach. Usage: The Present Perfect is used to indicate a link between the present and the past. The time of the action is before now but not specified, and we are often more interested in the result than in the action itself. Structure: S + ‘has/have’ + V3 + Od. Present Perfect Continuous: I have been eating spinach since morning. Usage: The present perfect continuous refers to an unspecified time between 'before now' and 'now'. The speaker is thinking about something that started but perhaps did not finish in that period of time. He/she is interested in the process as well as the result, and this process may still be going on, or may have just finished. Structure: S + ‘have/has been’ + (V + ing) + O3. FUTURE TENSESubject = S Object = O Verb = V (V1 = present; V2 = past, V3 = future)a. Simple Future Tense: I will eat spinach tomorrow. Usage: To indicate an action, condition or circumstance that hasn’t happened yet. Structure: S + will + V + Ob. Future Continuous Tense: I will eat spinach. Usage: To indicate what will be going on sometime in future. Structure: S + will be + (V + ing) + Oc. Future Perfect Tense: I will have eaten spinach by the time you arrive. Usage: To indicate an action that will be complete before another event takes place. Structure: S + ‘will have’ + V3 + O d. Future Perfect Continuous Tense: I will have eaten spinach by the time she arrives. Usage: Like the future perfect simple, this form is used to project ourselves forward in time and to look back. It refers to events or actions in a time between now and some future time are unfinished. It is most often used with a time expression. Structure: S + ‘will have been’ + (V + ing) + O
29 Upvotes 8 Downvotes January 13, 2017
1
In English, there are 3 tenses. They all are classified into 4parts. There are 3 tenses: 1 Present tense 2 Past tense 3 Future tense They all are 4 types 1 Present tense (a)Present simple tense (b)Present continuous tense (c)Present perfect tense (d)Present perfect continuous tense. 2 Past tense (a) Past simple tense (b) Past continuous tense (c) Past perfect tense (d) Past perfect continuous tense. 3 Future tense (a) Future simple tense (b) Future continuous tense (c) Future Perfect tense (d) Future Perfect continuous tense.
10 Upvotes 2 Downvotes March 22, 2017
0
There are 3 tenses Past tense Present tense Future tense Past tense parts: simple past tense Past continuous Past perfect Past perfect continuous tense Present tense parts: Simple present Present continuous Present perfect Present perfect continuous tense Future tense parts: Simple future Future continuous Future perfect Future perfect continuous tense
5 Upvotes 1 Downvotes March 25, 2017
0
We have 3 tences in english and each tense sub classified into 4 tenses... Total 12... 1). Present tense Simple present tense Present continuous tense Present perfect tense Present perfect continuous tense 2). Past tense Simple past . Past continuous . Past perfect . Past perfect continuous 3). Future tense Simple Future Future continuous Future perfect Future perfect continuous
5 Upvotes 1 Downvotes March 22, 2017
0
There are 3 tenses in English ,present,past,future,
2 Upvotes 1 Downvotes March 22, 2017
0
there are 3 tense in English. 1. present tense 2. past " 3. future " and they all are 4 type. 1. indefinite tense. { pre , past, future} 2. continuous " . { " " " } 3. perfect. " .{ " " " } 4. " continuous ".{ " " " }
2 Upvotes 1 Downvotes March 24, 2017
0
there is only 3 types of tenses 1.Present tense 2.Past tense 3.future tense
2 Upvotes 1 Downvotes March 30, 2017
0
There are 12 tenses in English. They are as follows, Present tense :- 1)Simple present tense 2)Present continuous tense 3)Present perfect tense 4)Present perfect continuous tense Past tense :- 1)Simple past tense 2)Past continuous tense 3)Past perfect tense 4)Past perfect continuous tense Future tense :- 1)Simple future tense 2)Future continuous tense 3)Future perfect tense 4)Future perfect continuous tense
3 Upvotes 3 Downvotes March 22, 2017
0
There are 3 tenses in English. These are Present , Past and future. Present tense can be classified into four types. These are Present Indefinite ,Present Continuous ,Present Perfect ,Present Perfect Continuous. Past tense can be classified into four types .These are Past Indefinite,Past Continuous,Past Perfect, Past Perfect Continuous. Future tense can be classified into four types .There are Future Indefinite ,Future Continuous ,Future Perfect ,Future Perfect Continuous. But Future Perfect Continuous tense is not used nowadays.
1 Upvotes 1 Downvotes April 13, 2017
0
There are three types of sentences in English. They are Present, Past, and future and there are four kinds of each sentences.
1 Upvotes 1 Downvotes March 30, 2017
0
How many tenses are there in English?
In English, there are 3 tenses: PAST, PRESENT and FUTURE. These tenses are further conjugated on the basis of: Simple, Continuous, Perfect and Perfect Continuous. Let us look at the tenses and their structure. Note, in the structure: Subject = S Object = O Verb = V (V1 = present; V2 = past, V3 = future)1. PAST TENSEa. Simple Past: I ate spinach yesterday. Usage: To indicate past habit – or an action that has already been completed. Structure: S + V2 + O b. Past Continuous: I was eating spinach. Usage: To indicate uncompleted action of the past. Structure: S + ‘was/were’ + (V + ing) + O c. Past Perfect: I had eaten spinach when she arrived. Usage: The past perfect refers to a time earlier than before now. It is used to make it clear that one event happened before another in the past. It does not matter which event is mentioned first - the tense makes it clear which one happened first. Structure: S + ‘had’ + V3 + Od. Perfect Continuous: I had been eating spinach when she arrived. Usage: We use the Past Perfect Continuous to show that something started in the past and continued up until another time in the past. Structure: S + ‘had been’ + (V + ing) + O2. PRESENT TENSEa. Simple Present Tense: I east spinach every day. Usage: 1. To express habits, general truths, repeated actions or unchanging situations, emotions and wishes. 2. To express fixed arrangements, present or future: Your exam starts at 09.00 Structure: S + V1 + Ob. Present Continuous Tense: I am eating spinach. Usage: Action taking place in the moment of speaking Structure: S + ‘am/is/are’ + (V + ing) + Oc. Present Perfect Tense: I have eaten all of the spinach. Usage: The Present Perfect is used to indicate a link between the present and the past. The time of the action is before now but not specified, and we are often more interested in the result than in the action itself. Structure: S + ‘has/have’ + V3 + Od. Present Perfect Continuous: I have been eating spinach since morning. Usage: The present perfect continuous refers to an unspecified time between 'before now' and 'now'. The speaker is thinking about something that started but perhaps did not finish in that period of time. He/she is interested in the process as well as the result, and this process may still be going on, or may have just finished. Structure: S + ‘have/has been’ + (V + ing) + O3. FUTURE TENSESubject = S Object = O Verb = V (V1 = present; V2 = past, V3 = future)a. Simple Future Tense: I will eat spinach tomorrow. Usage: To indicate an action, condition or circumstance that hasn’t happened yet. Structure: S + will + V + Ob. Future Continuous Tense: I will eat spinach. Usage: To indicate what will be going on sometime in future. Structure: S + will be + (V + ing) + Oc. Future Perfect Tense: I will have eaten spinach by the time you arrive. Usage: To indicate an action that will be complete before another event takes place. Structure: S + ‘will have’ + V3 + O d. Future Perfect Continuous Tense: I will have eaten spinach by the time she arrives. Usage: Like the future perfect simple, this form is used to project ourselves forward in time and to look back. It refers to events or actions in a time between now and some future time are unfinished. It is most often used with a time expression. Structure: S + ‘will have been’ + (V + ing) + O

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